DARRELL ISSA: Has he changed?


According to Wikipedia #1
A fellow soldier, Jay Bergey, claimed Issa stole his Dodge Charger in 1971, and that "I confronted Issa ... I got in his face and threatened to kill him, and magically my car reappeared the next day, abandoned on the turnpike." No charges were ever filed. Issa has denied any theft.
After receiving a hardship discharge in 1972 after his father suffered a heart attack, Issa earned a General Educational Development (GED) certificate. Twice that year, he was arrested. In the first incident he was indicted by a grand jury for an alleged theft of a Maserati, but prosecutors dropped the charge. In the second incident, he was stopped for driving the wrong way on a one-way street, and a police officer noticed a firearm in his glove compartment. Issa was charged with carrying a concealed weapon. He pleaded guilty to a charge of possession of an unregistered firearm, and was sentenced to six months' probation and a small fine. Issa has said he believes the record has since been expunged.

According to Wikipedia #2
After receiving a hardship discharge in 1972 after his father suffered a heart attack, Issa earned a General Educational Development (GED) certificate. Twice that year, he was arrested. In the first incident he was indicted by a grand jury for an alleged theft of a Maserati, but prosecutors dropped the charge. In the second incident, he was stopped for driving the wrong way on a one-way street, and a police officer noticed a firearm in his glove compartment. Issa was charged with carrying a concealed weapon. He pleaded guilty to a charge of possession of an unregistered firearm, and was sentenced to six months' probation and a small fine. Issa has said he believes the record has since been expunged. 
According to Wikipedia #3
hortly before his discharge in 1980, Issa was again indicted for grand theft auto. According to court documents, Darrel's brother William Issa had gone to a used car dealer and offered to sell his brother's car, a 1976 Mercedes sedan, while impersonating his brother. With an Ohio driver’s license belonging to Darrell, William was given $16,000 for the car from the dealer. Shortly after the sale, Darrell reported the car stolen and told the police that he had left the title in the trunk. During the investigation Darrell gave conflicting statements about whether he had recently obtained a replacement driver’s license. This evidence resulted in police suspecting that the brothers had conspired to fraudulently sell Darrell’s car and then collect on the insurance policy and the sale of the car.
Darrell and his brother were then indicted for grand theft. Darrell claimed he had no knowledge of William’s theft and sale while William claimed that his brother had authorized him to sell the car. As the investigation continued, Darrell went to the dealership the car was sold to and repurchased his car. A few months after Darrell had repurchased his car, investigators had dropped the charges against him. In 1981 in Cleveland, Issa crashed a truck he was driving into another motorists car and, according to court records, Issa told her that he did not have time to wait for the police and he then left the scene. The other motorist then sued Issa for $20,000 and they eventually settled out of court for an undisclosed amount.
According to Wikipedia #4
Issa soon turned Steal Stopper around, to the point that it was supplying Ford with thousands of car alarms and negotiating a similar deal with Toyota. But early in the morning of September 7, 1982, the offices and factory of Quantum and Steal Stopper in the Cleveland suburb of Maple Heights caught fire. The fire took three hours to put out. The buildings and almost all the inventory within were destroyed. An investigation of the cause of the fire noted "suspicious burn patterns" with fires starting in two places aided by an accelerant such as gasoline.
Adkins said Issa appeared to prepare for a fire by increasing the fire insurance policy 462% three weeks previously, and by removing computer equipment holding accounting and customer information. St. Paul Insurance, suspicious of arson and insurance fraud, initially paid only $25,000 according to Issa. Issa then sued St. Paul Insurance for $175,000 and eventually the two parties settled out of court with Issa receiving approximately $20,000.





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